This time on the show, Cookies beware! It’s Session Hijacking time. Darren reports from Automate 2011 with a 28 foot multi-touch bar. Plus, websites made easy with Kompozer, a Backtrack vs Blackbuntu review and a whole lot more.

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Hacker Headlines

SSL provider Comodo was hacked allowing attackers to obtain secure certificates for Google, Yahoo, Skype and others. comodo is claiming that the sophisticated attack against its European partner must have been “state-driven.” Comodo’s own incident reportpoints out IP addresses from Iran responsible for the attack. While simply obtaining these certificates, which have since been disabled, wouldn’t make those sites vulnerable — it would allow passwords and emails to be snooped using man-in-the-middle attacks to impersonate the legitimate sites. That would be pretty trivial to do if, say, you were Iran, which controls the nations telecommunications infrastructure.

The RSA’s SecurID systems has been hacked! The SecurID is a tool that authenticates by having you key in a password but also a series of random numbers. A few days ago the tool sent out an email to it’s users saying it was a victim of a hack that extracted certain data from the RSA’s system. Data that was directly related to their SecurID two-factor authentication tools. The RSA says it isn’t that bad, but make sure you beef up security at your company, i.e. make stronger passwords. Like that’s really going to get people to change their passwords.

Say you wanted to write your own Stuxnet like worm to attack SCADA systems? Well your job just got a lot easier. Security researcher Luigi Auriemma released proof of concept code for 34 vulnerabilities affecting SCADA systems from Siemens, Iconics, 7-Technologies and DATAC. The code, released on the bugtraq mailing list, doesn’t affect the backend systems, merely the operator platforms, however they would allow attackers to potentially crash systems, retrieve sensitive data or dig deeper into the network.

Check out those sweet Nintendo 3DS’s at your local retailer! Demo units have been available to play in stores, but they won’t let you check out the menu or the specs underneath the games that autoplay on the devices. Luckily, there is now a nice little hack to let you get into the main menu and see what lies beneath inside these awesome new toys. Check the link and give it a try.

Is your government or ISP messing with your data? In the wake of the Internet blackouts of Egypt and Libya, Google is announcing awards of at least a million dollars to Georgia Tech researchers working on tools for web users, as well as smartphones and tablets, which detect whether ISPs are adhering to service level agreements and if data is meing tampered with.

HakTip: Session hijacking with Firesheep

This week’s Hak Tip comes to us from Gary. Websites always make you login with a username and password, but when you’re on their page all cozy and logged in, you’re browsing insecurely on a regular old HTTP site. HTTP session hacking (called sidejacking) happens when an attacker gets the users cookie which you were transmitted when you first logged in, and they can use it to do anything you would normally do. The only way to really protect yourself from this is through SSL or HTTPS like what you see on your banking websites.

Firesheep, by Eric Butler, demonstrates how vunerable your login is. It’s a man in the middle attack firefox extension that anyone has the ability to use.

To use Firesheep, first make sure to download winpcap. Then download the browser extension and open it using firefox by dragging it into your list of extensions and add-ons. You may need to restart Firefox. Go to View–>Sidebar–>Firesheep and enable it. Now, simply click start capturing and you’ll be able to see the username and photo of anyone on your network that logs into one of the specific sites that Firesheep uses. Click on the name or photo of anyone on the list, and you are now logged in as them, with the ability to do whatever you want as them on that site. Scary huh? Luckily Twitter and Facebook have caught on to this and have enabled the ability to use HTTPS secure logins on their sites. So if you haven’t updated your settings, do it now!

Got a tip you want to share? Email them to tips@hak5.org and we’ll show them off!

The 28 foot multi-touch bar!

Darren reports from the Automate 2011 conference in Chicago checking out the mtBar from Crunchy Logistics and Imaging Source. This 28 foot rear diffused illumination multi-touch bar surface sports unlimited tracking of fingers and objects at 120 FPS. Darren gets the juicy details from Niel Dufva, Aaron Bitler and Brandon Hill from Crunchy Logistics, as well as John Berryman from Imaging Source.

Trivia!

Last week’s question was: In Season 5 of X Files, Esther Nairn is the creator of what ‘narly’ entertainment software? The answer is: Autonomous Bots in Ninjitsu Princess. This weeks question is: In what episode of the X Files can the Lone Gunmen be seen attending DefCon in Vegas? Answer at hak5.org/trivia for your chance to grab up some swag!

Snubs Report: Kompozer

Shannon checks out the easy web authoring tool Kompozer. Here are some of her favorite features:

  • Web authoring tool
  • No HTML or coding needed
  • FTP Site Manager- browseable side bar and tree view (kind of like Explorer’s folder pane)
  • Color Picker- Easy to use color swap, just click with your mouse.
  • Tabs- Can edit several docs at once
  • CSS Editor- Easy to create stylesheets
  • Styler- Toolbar lets you change style instantly
  • Customize toolbars
  • Forms- XUL-based UI to edit forms
  • Cleaner- get rid of annoying
    ‘s- make valid documents
  • XFN- Can add XHTML info saying you know and trust an external link
  • Visible Marks- can view carriage returns and block borders.
  • Table/ Cell resizing rulers- Adjust rows and columns easily
  • Automated Spellchecker

Road Test: Corsair Force SSD

In the words of Mr Horse: “No sir, I don’t like it”

While the Corsair Force SSD has great performance numbers, a few major annoyances are harshing on my technolust.

No SSD should BSOD Windows on S3 resume. Nor should it report “No bootable device” upon cold boot.

Sorry Corsair, I gave it a fair chance for just about a month and even with the latest firmware this thing’s a dud.

Emails: Computer models and Blackbuntu vs Backtrack

Victor writes: I was wondering whats the computer that you usually have in the show cause it looks really good i think i might want to get one but i don’t know the model or manufacturer.

Darren and Shannon have both recently upgraded to the 11.6″ Acer Aspire TimelineX 1830T. Darren has the Intel Core i7 version while Shannon has opted for the i3.

Prior to these Shannon was using the 9″ Acer Aspire One and the 10″ Nokia Booklet 3G while Darren has had the 7″ ASUS eee PC 701, 9″ Acer Aspire One and 15″ ASUS N53J.

Juan writes: I was watching episode 903 and at the end you mention Blackbuntu. I have use Backtrack before but have never herd of Blackbuntu I start it to poking around the internet and found not only Blackbuntu but GnackTrack too both are sort of the same idea both are base on ubuntu both use gnome and both have the standard Backtrack program suit so I was think all tree of them make for a good head to head battle or just for a review

Darren has been playing with Blackbuntu for about a week now. Prior to that he’s been using BackTrack since 3.0, but never as a primary OS. Here are some of his initial observations:

  • Blackbuntu is based on ubuntu 10.10 using Gnome as the window manager and contains a similar feature set to BackTrack.
  • BackTrack is more established, while Blackbuntu is on version 0.2 it’s counterpart BackTrack is nearing beta of version 5.
  • BackTrack is the basis for the Offensive Security courses and certifications, which teach all sorts of pentesting and wireless attacks in both live-in-person and online learning scenarios
  • In comparison to BackTrack, Blackbuntu doesn’t have much of a community. You’re more likely to find tutorials and help for BackTrack
  • That said, most of what you’d do with BackTrack will run very similarly on Blackbuntu.
  • The biggest strong point Blackbuntu has in my book is the fact that it’s a highly customized version of Ubuntu with Gnome, which I’m already familiar with, and to me is better suited as a primary Linux OS.
  • Then again I’ve run into stability issues with Blackbuntu that have me, for the time being, switching back to Backtrack 4r2
  • I’ll reassess these in the near future when BackTrack 5 debuts, which will be both 32 and 64 bit compatible, running on Ubuntu 10.04 with official support for KDE, Gnome and Fluxbox

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3 Comments

  • Great hak tip ;)

  • texsmasher 3 years ago

    dude thats is so wicked on the kompozer also I am glad Darren seemed to me to calmed down and not low-key berating Shannon which why i stopped watching for a while.

  • KillswitchOverride 3 years ago

    Darren, I understand your problem with stability issues in BB. But compared to BT4r2, Blackbuntu has, in my opinion, a better face in comparison. Understandably, Backtrack does have a good sized community for support, but since Blackbuntu has pretty much the same security suite, you can use the same tools with the same efficiency and techniques in BT4, but the Gnome desktop captured my fancy.