This time on the show we're automating everything! Darren shows off intelligent scripting with expect for Linux. Then I'll be encrypting folders from a context menu in Gnome, pairing 'em with some cloud services and boom, you've got secure backups. Plus, multi-core GCC compiling, directory size scripting and can USB drives be trusted? All that and more this time on Hak5!

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This time on the show we're automating everything! Darren shows off intelligent scripting with expect for Linux. Then I'll be encrypting folders from a context menu in Gnome, pairing 'em with some cloud services and boom, you've got secure backups. Plus, multi-core GCC compiling, directory size scripting and can USB drives be trusted? All that and more this time on Hak5!

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Whether you're a beginner or a pro, HakTip is essential viewing for current and aspiring hackers, computer enthusiasts, and IT professionals. With a how-to approach to all things Information Technology, HakTip breaks down the core concepts, tools, and techniques of Linux, Wireless Networks, Systems Administration, and more

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4 Comments

  • isnt 1023 the last 10 bit number?
    1111111111

  • BenjaminD. 2 years ago

    Hey Darren,

    could you not just start a linux live-cd (or live-usb for that matter) and then plug in the suspicious usb drive?

    It may be a bit anoying, but I think it is safe.

    BenjaminD.

  • Gord Campbell 2 years ago

    To safely insert a flash drive, in Ubuntu 11.10 go to the top-right corner and click System Settings. Select “Removable Media.” Check the box, “Never prompt or start programs on media insertion.”

  • I got thinking of protecting against evil rubber duckies and realised that mass storage isn’t the problem. While it’s relatively simple to prevent FUSE from mounting mass storage automatically, the thing we want is to prevent the “mass storage device” from sending HID events.

    Perhaps setting up a cheap and old box (or perhaps even a little RaspberryPi) with the usbhid module blacklisted (sudo modprobe -r usbhid) to plug a device to check into. A wireshark/usb dump can be done over ssh, et al to inspect the true intentions of the device. It’s a simple way to check for vendor ID, etc. and since it only requires runlevel 3, mouse and keyboard events/attacks can be rendered useless with a repurposed getty input (perhaps just an inkey program that redirects to a file to figure out what said evil rubberducky is up to).